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Late last week, an Illinois woman filed a $5 million lawsuit against the social networking site. The suit, filed in a San Jose, California, alleges LinkedIn violated promises to consumers by not proper security measures in place to protect their site users. The lawsuit comes on the heels of LinkedIn’s security breach where over 6 million of their customer passwords were stolen. The passwords turned up on various websites that are known to be visited by hackers. The suit is asking for class-action status.

Filed by Katie Szpyrka, a user of the website from Illinois is being represented by Chicago-based law firm, Edelson McGuire. In court papers, her Chicago-based law firm, Edelson McGuire, said LinkedIn had “deceived customers” by having a security policy “in clear contradiction of accepted industry standards for database security.”

This isn’t Edelson McGuire’s first time taking on companies for Internet privacy violations. In 2009, they were successful in obtaining a settlement against social gaming company, RockYou, over a data breach.

On Wednesday, LinkedIn’s spokeswoman Erin O’Harra said the lawsuit brought against the social networking site was “without merit and was driven “by lawyers looking to take advantage of the situation. No member account has been breached as a result of the incident, and we have no reason to believe that any LinkedIn member has been injured.”

LinkedIn, based in Mountain View, California, is a networking site for professionals to display their resume and make contact in various an employment and professional networking site with more than 160 million members, was the latest massive corporate data breach to have attracted the attention of class-action lawyers.

LinkedIn is the latest internet company to face a lawsuit after a security breach. Zappos, part of the Amazon.com family, is facing nine planned class-action suits in Nevada federal court. Zappos disclosed in January that hackers had taken information affecting over 20 million of their customers.

The case against is Katie Szpyrka v. LinkedIn Corporation, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, No. 12-3088.